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Rabindranath Tagore

Rabindranath Tagore ( (listen); pronounced [rɔˈbindɾɔnatʰ ˈʈʰakuɾ]; 7 May 1861 – 7 August 1941) was a Bengali poet, writer, playwright, composer, philosopher, social reformer and painter. He reshaped Bengali literature and music as well as Indian art with Contextual Modernism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Author of the "profoundly sensitive, fresh and beautiful" poetry of Gitanjali, he became in 1913 the first non-European and the first lyricist to win the Nobel Prize in Literature. Tagore's poetic songs were viewed as spiritual and mercurial; however, his "elegant prose and magical poetry" remain largely unknown outside Bengal. He was a fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society. Referred to as "the Bard of Bengal", Tagore was known by sobriquets: Gurudeb, Kobiguru, Biswokobi.

A Bengali Brahmin from Calcutta with ancestral gentry roots in Burdwan district and Jessore, Tagore wrote poetry as an eight-year-old. At the age of sixteen, he released his first substantial poems under the pseudonym Bhānusiṃha ("Sun Lion"), which were seized upon by literary authorities as long-lost classics. By 1877 he graduated to his first short stories and dramas, published under his real name. As a humanist, universalist, internationalist, and ardent critic of nationalism, he denounced the British Raj and advocated independence from Britain. As an exponent of the Bengal Renaissance, he advanced a vast canon that comprised paintings, sketches and doodles, hundreds of texts, and some two thousand songs; his legacy also endures in his founding of Visva-Bharati University.

Tagore modernised Bengali art by spurning rigid classical forms and resisting linguistic strictures. His novels, stories, songs, dance-dramas, and essays spoke to topics political and personal. Gitanjali (Song Offerings), Gora (Fair-Faced) and Ghare-Baire (The Home and the World) are his best-known works, and his verse, short stories, and novels were acclaimed—or panned—for their lyricism, colloquialism, naturalism, and unnatural contemplation. His compositions were chosen by two nations as national anthems: India's "Jana Gana Mana" and Bangladesh's "Amar Shonar Bangla". The Sri Lankan national anthem was inspired by his work.

Birth and Death Data: Born May 6, 1861 (Kolkata), Died August 7, 1941 (Kolkata)

Date Range of DAHR Recordings: 1916 - 1939

Roles Represented in DAHR: author

= Recordings are available for online listening.
= Recordings were issued from this master. No recordings issued from other masters.

Recordings

Company Matrix No. Size First Recording Date Title Primary Performer Description Role Audio
Victor B-17183 10-in. 2/17/1916 The bird of the wilderness Alma Gluck Soprano vocal solo, with orchestra author  
Victor B-30629 10-in. 8/12/1924 The bird of the wilderness Jenn Rawlings Anderson Female vocal solo, with piano author  
Victor BVE-67706 10-in. 12/12/1930 Dweller in dreams Allan Jones Male vocal solo, with piano author  
Victor BS-73080 10-in. 7/8/1932 When I bring to you colour'd toys Rose Bampton ; Wilfrid Pelletier Contralto vocal solo, with piano author  
Victor BS-73081 10-in. 7/8/1932 Light, my light Rose Bampton Contralto vocal solo, with piano author  
Victor LCS-100355 12-in. (33-1/3 rpm) 4/6/1936 Care selve Martin W. Bush ; Mable Allen Smails Female vocal solo, with piano author  
Victor BS-07876 10-in. 4/27/1937 Do not go, my love Lauritz Melchior ; Ignace Strasfogel Tenor vocal solo, with piano author  
Victor PBS-036489 10-in. 9/11/1939 Do not go, my love Giuseppe Bamboschek ; Jeanette MacDonald Soprano vocal solo, with piano author  
Victor BVE-Test-1735 10-in. 6/28/1932 Do not go, my love Rose Bampton Contralto vocal solo, with piano author  
Columbia W140589 10-in. 5/6/1925 The bird of the wilderness Oscar Seagle Baritone vocal solo, with orchestra author  
Brunswick E18846-E18849 10-in. 4/21/1926 Do not go, my love Lauritz Melchior Tenor vocal solo, with orchestra author  
Brunswick E18927-E18928 10-in. 4/27/1926 Do not go, my love Fredric Fradkin ; Lauritz Melchior Tenor vocal solo, with orchestra and violin obbligato author  

Citation

Discography of American Historical Recordings, s.v. "Tagore, Rabindranath," accessed March 1, 2024, https://adp.library.ucsb.edu/names/102740.

Tagore, Rabindranath. (2024). In Discography of American Historical Recordings. Retrieved March 1, 2024, from https://adp.library.ucsb.edu/names/102740.

"Tagore, Rabindranath." Discography of American Historical Recordings. UC Santa Barbara Library, 2024. Web. 1 March 2024.

DAHR Persistent Identifier

URI: https://adp.library.ucsb.edu/names/102740

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