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Frederick Peterson

Frederick Peterson (March 1, 1859 – July 9, 1938) was an American neurologist and poet. Peterson was at the forefront of psychoanalysis in the United States, publishing one of the first articles of Freud and Jung's theories of Free Association in 1909.

Peterson was born in Faribault, Minnesota. After graduating from the University at Buffalo, he attended the Universities of Vienna, Zurich, Strassburg and Gőttingen. Upon his return to the United States, he became a professor at the University at Buffalo in 1882. For the following decade he practiced as a neurologist in New York City. He was involved in Harold P. Brown's 1888 anti-alternating current dog electrocution demonstrations at Columbia University during the war of the currents and later that year was appointed by the New York Medico-Legal Society to lead up a committee finalizing the method of electrical execution via the electric chair in that state. He spent 1893–1894 as a professor at the University of Vermont. In 1900 he was appointed president of the New York State Commission on Lunacy. From 1903 until his retirement, he served as a professor of psychiatry at Columbia University. He was also a well known connoisseur and collector of Chinese paintings.

Peterson's major contributions to medical theory include editorial positions at:

  • The Journal of Nervous and Medical Diseases
  • The New York Medical Journal
  • Mental Diseases (9th ed. 1920)
  • A text-book of legal medicine and toxicology (1903-04) with Walter Stanley Haines Philadelphia and London, W. B. Saunders & company; second edition published as Legal medicine and toxicology by many specialists, edited by Frederick Peterson, Walter S. Haines, and Ralph W. Webster. Philadelphia : W.B. Saunders, 1923.

In addition to his numerous medical writings, Peterson was an accomplished poet publishing Poems and Swedish Translations in 1883, In the Shade of the Ygdrasil in 1893, and The Flutter of the Gold Leaf (1922)

Peterson's daughter, Virgilia Peterson was the noted author, critic and host of the Dumont Network program The Author Meets The Critics. A Grandson, Prince Nicolas Sapieha was the well known art and architecture photographer. Ted Jessup, the American television producer is a great great grandson.

Birth and Death Data: Born March 1st, 1859, Died July 9th, 1938

Date Range of DAHR Recordings: 1901 - 1929

Roles Represented in DAHR: lyricist

Recordings (Results 1-25 of 27 records)

Company Matrix No. Size First Recording Date Title Primary Performer Description Role Audio
Victor [Pre-matrix C-]2342 12-in. 1901-1902 The sweetest flower that blows Harry Macdonough Male vocal solo lyricist  
Victor C-111 [Old series] 12-in. 2/9/1903 or 5/26/1903 The sweetest flower that blows Harry Macdonough Male vocal solo, with piano lyricist  
Victor B-4534 10-in. 5/28/1907 At parting Louise Homer Contralto vocal solo, with orchestra lyricist  
Victor B-10169 10-in. 4/11/1911 At parting Elizabeth Wheeler Female vocal solo lyricist  
Victor B-14375 10-in. 1/26/1914 At parting Julia Culp Contralto vocal solo, with piano lyricist  
Victor B-20699 10-in. 9/26/1917 At parting Ernestine Schumann-Heink Contralto vocal solo, with orchestra lyricist  
Victor B-23591 10-in. 1/20/1920 At parting Geraldine Farrar Soprano vocal solo, with orchestra lyricist  
Victor B-25797 10-in. 12/8/1921 As we part Sophie Braslau Contralto vocal solo, with orchestra lyricist  
Victor B-29461 10-in. 2/11/1924 At parting Kathryn Meisle Female vocal solo, with orchestra lyricist  
Victor BVE-37329 10-in. 12/24/1926 At parting Mary Garden Soprano vocal solo, with piano lyricist  
Victor BVE-40010 10-in. 9/14/1927 At parting Ernestine Schumann-Heink Contralto vocal solo, with piano lyricist  
Victor [Trial 1914-02-26-06] Not documented 2/26/1914 Spring Paul Reimers Male vocal solo, with piano lyricist  
Victor [Trial 1918-05-10-04] Not documented 5/10/1918 At parting Marie Tiffany Female vocal solo, with piano lyricist  
Victor [Trial 1918-07-17-03] Not documented 7/17/1918 At parting Marie Tiffany Female vocal solo, with piano lyricist  
Columbia 3337 10-in. ca. 1905-Feb. 1906 The sweetest flower that blows John Dunsmure Male vocal solo, with orchestra lyricist  
Columbia 38837 10-in. 5/10/1913 At parting Carolina White Soprano vocal solo, with orchestra lyricist  
Columbia 39950 10-in. 3/16/1915 At parting Mary Jordan Female vocal solo, with orchestra lyricist  
Columbia 46254 10-in. 12/9/1915 At parting Clyde A. Nichols Male vocal solo, with orchestra lyricist  
Columbia 46279 10-in. 12/15/1915 At parting Columbia Stellar Quartette Male vocal quartet, unaccompanied lyricist  
Columbia 30145 12-in. 5/23/1911 At parting Lillian Nordica Soprano vocal solo lyricist  
Columbia 30482 12-in. 4/29/1910 At parting Lillian Nordica Soprano vocal solo lyricist  
Columbia W140479 10-in. 3/31/1925 At parting Barbara Maurel Mezzo-soprano vocal solo, with instrumental trio lyricist  
Brunswick E29745 10-in. May 1929 At parting Kathryn Meisle Female vocal solo, with orchestra lyricist  
Edison 5368 10-in. 2/15/1917 As we part Gladys Rice Female vocal solo, with orchestra lyricist  
Edison 6095 10-in. Mar. 1918 At parting Amy Ellerman Contralto vocal solo, with orchestra lyricist  
(Results 1-25 of 27 records)

Citation

Discography of American Historical Recordings, s.v. "Peterson, Frederick," accessed March 6, 2021, https://adp.library.ucsb.edu/names/110125.

Peterson, Frederick. (2021). In Discography of American Historical Recordings. Retrieved March 6, 2021, from https://adp.library.ucsb.edu/names/110125.

"Peterson, Frederick." Discography of American Historical Recordings. UC Santa Barbara Library, 2021. Web. 6 March 2021.

DAHR Persistent Identifier

URI: https://adp.library.ucsb.edu/names/110125

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