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Fredric March

Fredric March (born Ernest Frederick McIntyre Bickel; August 31, 1897 – April 14, 1975) was an American actor, regarded as one of Hollywood's most celebrated stars of the 1930s and 1940s. As a performer he was known for his protean versatility. He received numerous accolades including two Academy Awards, a Golden Globe Award, and a Tony Award as well as nominations for three BAFTA Awards and three Emmy Awards.

He began his career in 1920, by working as an extra in movies filmed in New York City. He made his stage debut on Broadway in 1926 at the age of 29, and by the end of the decade, he signed a film contract with Paramount Pictures. He made seven pictures in 1929. He went on to receive two Academy Awards for his performances in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931), and The Best Years of Our Lives (1947). His other Oscar-nominated performances were in the films The Royal Family of Broadway (1930), A Star is Born (1937), and Death of a Salesman (1951).

March gained popularity after establishing himself with leading man with roles in films such as Honor Among Lovers (1931), Merrily We Go to Hell (1932), Design for Living (1933), Death Takes a Holiday (1934), Les Misérables (1935), Anna Karenina (1935), The Dark Angel (1935), Nothing Sacred (1937), and I Married a Witch (1942). His later film roles include Executive Suite (1954), The Bridges at Toko-Ri (1954), The Desperate Hours (1955), Inherit the Wind (1960), and Seven Days in May (1964). He made his final film appearance in The Iceman Cometh (1973).

Also known for his stage roles, he made his Broadway debut in the play The Melody Man (1926). During his career acting on stage he had twice won the Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play for his performances in the Ruth Gordon play Years Ago (1947) and Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey into Night (1956). He along with Helen Hayes are the only ones to have won both the Academy Award and the Tony Award twice.

Birth and Death Data: Born August 31, 1897 (Racine), Died April 14, 1975 (Los Angeles)

Date Range of DAHR Recordings: 1944 - 1949

Roles Represented in DAHR: speaker, narrator

= Recordings are available for online listening.
= Recordings were issued from this master. No recordings issued from other masters.

Recordings

Company Matrix No. Size First Recording Date Title Primary Performer Description Role Audio
Decca 72188 10-in. 5/27/1944 The selfish giant, part 1 Fredric March speaker  
Decca 72189 10-in. 5/27/1944 The selfish giant, part 2 Fredric March speaker  
Decca 72190 10-in. 5/27/1944 The selfish giant, part 3 Fredric March speaker  
Decca 72191 10-in. 5/27/1944 The selfish giant, part 4 Fredric March speaker  
Decca 74656 10-in. 5/27/1944 The selfish giant, part 1 Fredric March speaker, narrator  
Decca 74657 10-in. 5/27/1944 The selfish giant, part 2 Fredric March speaker, narrator  
Decca 74758 2/14/1949 The skin of our teeth Fredric March speaker  
Decca 74759 2/14/1949 Years ago (Act 2-Scene 2) Fredric March speaker  
Decca L 3585 10-in. 9/7/1944 Paul Revere's ride, part 1 Fredric March speaker  
Decca L 3586 10-in. 9/7/1944 Paul Revere's ride, part 2 Fredric March speaker  
Decca L 4208 6/11/1946 Paul Revere's ride, part 1 Fredric March speaker  
Decca L 4209 6/11/1946 Paul Revere's ride, part 2 Fredric March speaker  

Citation

Discography of American Historical Recordings, s.v. "March, Fredric," accessed February 23, 2024, https://adp.library.ucsb.edu/names/206240.

March, Fredric. (2024). In Discography of American Historical Recordings. Retrieved February 23, 2024, from https://adp.library.ucsb.edu/names/206240.

"March, Fredric." Discography of American Historical Recordings. UC Santa Barbara Library, 2024. Web. 23 February 2024.

DAHR Persistent Identifier

URI: https://adp.library.ucsb.edu/names/206240

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